How to Grow Vegetables Outdoors in the Winter

How to Grow Vegetables Outdoors in the Winter

Joe SkinnerNov 11, '20

It's that time of the year when all you want is to curl up by the fire with a cup of hot chocolate in your hands. But, while you are getting cozy and ready to enjoy the beauty of the season, your garden is falling victim to the cold and sunscald.

There's nothing you can do about it, right, so you will just leave nature to follow its course and start fresh in the spring.

What if we told you that you can grow vegetables outdoors in the winter too?

Here's what you need to know to harvest into the winter. 

 

Don't Let Your Garden Die

You've probably harvested most of your fruits and veggies, but what are you going to do about the crop that's still in your garden? Leafy greens, carrots, beets, scallions, and parsnip are among the vegetables that can resist well into the late months of fall, but they will die if you don't protect them until the cold comes. You can add an extra layer of mulch or build a strawbale cold frame to protect your crop.

Mulch is perhaps the easiest and cheapest way to prolong your crop and harvest well into the winter months. Cover the garden bed with a thick layer of shredded leaves and then put an old bedsheet on top of it for insulation. Mulching works wonders for crops like carrots, parsnip, or beets, but be careful not to let the soil freeze before doing it.

If you have tall crops like kale or Brussels sprouts, then a strawbale cold frame may work better for winter harvesting. They are not difficult to build either. Position the strawbale around your crop, and then place an old door or window on top of it. Simply lift the top frame whenever you want to harvest your crop.

 

Choose the Right Veggies to Grow During Winter

Winter gardening doesn't have to be only about protecting what you already have. You can also plant new crops during the cold season as long as you are smart about it. Opt for plants that are resistant to cold and don't require too much maintenance to grow. Leafy greens, for example, such as spinach, parsley or endives can withstand both the cold and frost.

 

Over to You

Winter gardening can be fun, laid back, and bring you a lot of satisfaction. If you are ready to start your winter gardening project, check The Soil King's collection of tools and products.